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Ukraine Financial Guide

Last update: Aug. 14, 2010 (created)


This section of TryUkraine.com focuses on financial aspects of traveling and living in Ukraine. Here you can learn about Ukraine's currency, the Hryvnia, where to exchange money, whether US dollars or Euros are widely used, and how to be discreet with your money. There's also a page on the cost of living in Ukraine as well as a guide to inexpensive living in Ukraine.

General tips for travelers:

  • ATM machines are all over the place and almost always within easy walking distance. They typically give out money in Ukrainian Hryvnias only.
  • Public transportation is really cheap, food is fairly cheap, and trains are quite inexpensive. Accommodations (except for couchsurfing and run-down Soviet hotels) can be overpriced. Good deals are certain Ukrainian hostels and, generally, apartments for short-term rent.

For immigrants and long-term expats:

  • Ukrainian society is organized differently than in western countries. Until you learn how things here operate, it's really easy to spend a lot of money unnecessarily because everything that is "western-style" costs much more.
  • For the average person with a modest lifestyle, $1000
  • a month should be enough to get by — rent an apartment, pay for food and transportation, go out once a week, and occasionally travel around Ukraine.


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